ATI radeon HD 5770


Last month AMD unleashed what went on to become the world’s fastest single-GPU graphics card by a convincing margin, the Radeon HD 5870. This was followed shortly by a slightly watered-down version known as the Radeon HD 5850. The latter has proved to be very competitive, playing second only to its bigger brother and at just $260, it stands without a doubt as the best value high performance offering available at the moment.

Continuing with the successful rollout of its Radeon HD 5000 series, AMD is now moving to attack the sub-$200 market, and hopes to keep the momentum going with the Radeon HD 5770 and 5750. Codenamed Juniper XT and Juniper LE, respectively, the first is said to cost just $160, while the lower-end 5750 will cost between $110 and $130 depending on memory configuration.

We’ve been particularly interested in the ATI Radeon HD 5770, as last generation’s Radeon HD 4770 was one of our all-time favorite budget graphics cards. Although it came late in the game, its excellent performance and operating efficiency earned it an “Outstanding” mark, making it the top choice in the $100 range. We certainly expect to see this new series live up to those standards.

But before we get to the benching business, there are a few things to be noted about the Radeon HD 5770. First off, at $160 it is 38% cheaper than the Radeon HD 5850, but it also has 40% less memory bandwidth at its disposal. This is largely due to the memory bus width being cut in half. The core configuration of the 5770 is also about 46% lighter, featuring fewer stream processor units, texture address and rasterization operator units.

Looking at pure raw specifications we expect the Radeon HD 5770 to be around 40% slower than the Radeon HD 5850. In other words, the Radeon HD 5770 should perform close to the once high-end 4870.

This should come as great news to gamers looking for a cheap upgrade. However, it is not previous generation Radeons that the 5770 has to worry about. Competing against it will be the similarly priced GeForce GTX 260. Despite the obvious disadvantages this year-old card carries, like higher power consumption and lack of DirectX 11 support, the GeForce GTX 260 is still a very worthy contender. So how will the 5770 compare?

ATI Radeon HD 5770 In Detail
The Radeon HD 5770 is essentially a more compact version of the 5850 we reviewed just days ago. Both products look much the same from all angles, and despite its lower power consumption levels, the Radeon HD 5770 maintains the dual slot cooling design.As a result this card should generate little noise and likely overclock very well, while taking as much estate as its higher performing siblings.

Compared to the Radeon HD 5870 and 5850 that measure 28cm and 24cm, respectively, the Radeon HD 5770 is just 21cm long. This is similar to existing Radeon HD 4850 and 4770 graphics cards and therefore AMD’s latest card should fit in any case that can support a mATX motherboard.

Furthermore, the Radeon HD 5770 features the exact core configuration of the Radeon HD 4870 and 4890: 800 SPUs, 40 TAUs (Texture Address Units) and 16 ROPs (Rasterization Operator Units).

The core clock speed also matches that of the Radeon HD 4890 card at 850MHz, while GDDR5 memory is set to operate at 1200MHz. There’s 1GB of memory in total spread across eight chips, which are located on the front and back side of the card.

Cooling the “Juniper XT” GPU is a fairly large aluminum heatsink made up of 36 fins measuring 10.5cm long, 6.0cm wide, and 2.5cm tall. Connected to the base of this heatsink are two copper heatpipes which help improve efficiency, while a 65x20mm blower fan draws air in from within the case and pushes it out through the rear of the case.

The Radeon HD 5770 features a remarkably low 18 watt idle consumption level, making it one of the most efficient graphics cards available today. When pushing the card to the extreme it will still suck up to 108 watts, but even with the increased thermal stress, noise levels were comparable to those of the Radeon HD 4770 or GeForce GTS 250 graphics cards.

In order to feed the Radeon HD 5770 enough power, AMD included a single 6-pin PCI Express power connector. Most manufacturers should also be shipping cards with a pair of Crossfire connectors for bridging two or more cards together, two dual DVI connectors, HDMI, and Display Port connections.

Last but not least, the Radeon HD 5770 keeps Eyefinity support. Like its higher-end variants in the 5000 series, you can hook up to three high resolution monitors (up to 2560×1600) to this board.

ATI Radeon HD 5770 In Detail
The Radeon HD 5770 is essentially a more compact version of the 5850 we reviewed just days ago. Both products look much the same from all angles, and despite its lower power consumption levels, the Radeon HD 5770 maintains the dual slot cooling design.As a result this card should generate little noise and likely overclock very well, while taking as much estate as its higher performing siblings.

Compared to the Radeon HD 5870 and 5850 that measure 28cm and 24cm, respectively, the Radeon HD 5770 is just 21cm long. This is similar to existing Radeon HD 4850 and 4770 graphics cards and therefore AMD’s latest card should fit in any case that can support a mATX motherboard.

Furthermore, the Radeon HD 5770 features the exact core configuration of the Radeon HD 4870 and 4890: 800 SPUs, 40 TAUs (Texture Address Units) and 16 ROPs (Rasterization Operator Units).

The core clock speed also matches that of the Radeon HD 4890 card at 850MHz, while GDDR5 memory is set to operate at 1200MHz. There’s 1GB of memory in total spread across eight chips, which are located on the front and back side of the card.

Cooling the “Juniper XT” GPU is a fairly large aluminum heatsink made up of 36 fins measuring 10.5cm long, 6.0cm wide, and 2.5cm tall. Connected to the base of this heatsink are two copper heatpipes which help improve efficiency, while a 65x20mm blower fan draws air in from within the case and pushes it out through the rear of the case.

The Radeon HD 5770 features a remarkably low 18 watt idle consumption level, making it one of the most efficient graphics cards available today. When pushing the card to the extreme it will still suck up to 108 watts, but even with the increased thermal stress, noise levels were comparable to those of the Radeon HD 4770 or GeForce GTS 250 graphics cards.

In order to feed the Radeon HD 5770 enough power, AMD included a single 6-pin PCI Express power connector. Most manufacturers should also be shipping cards with a pair of Crossfire connectors for bridging two or more cards together, two dual DVI connectors, HDMI, and Display Port connections.

Last but not least, the Radeon HD 5770 keeps Eyefinity support. Like its higher-end variants in the 5000 series, you can hook up to three high resolution monitors (up to 2560×1600) to this board.

Test System Specs & 3Dmark Vantage
Core i7 Test System Specs
– Intel Core i7 965 Extreme Edition (Overclocked @ 3.70GHz)
– x3 2GB G.Skill DDR3 PC3-12800 (CAS 9-9-9-24)
– Asus P6T Deluxe (Intel X58)
– OCZ GameXStream (700 watt)
– Seagate 500GB 7200-RPM (Serial ATA300)
– Asus GeForce GTX 260 (896MB)
– Asus GeForce 9800 GT (1GB)
– Asus GeForce 9600 GT (512MB)
– HIS Radeon HD 5850 (1GB)
– HIS Radeon HD 5770 (1GB)
– HIS Radeon HD 5750 (1GB)
– Asus Radeon HD 4870 (512MB)
– HIS Radeon HD 4850 (1GB)
– HIS Radeon HD 4770 (512MB)
– Asus Radeon HD 3850 (512MB)
Software
– Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (64-bit)
– Nvidia Forceware 191.03
– ATI Catalyst 9.10



According to 3Dmark Vantage the Radeon HD 5770 delivers roughly the same performance as the Radeon HD 4870 and GeForce GTX 260 graphics cards. It was considerably faster than the Radeon HD 4850 and 4770 graphics cards at all three tested resolutions. At 1920×1200, the Radeon HD 5770 produced a score of 5396pts, making it just 3% slower than the GeForce GTX 260, and 38% slower than the Radeon HD 5850.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: